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  • hilly 9:15 pm on February 12, 2017
    Tags: , , shlhg   

    The future of Enderby House at the Shooters Hill Local History Group 

    Enderby Wharf development

    Enderby Wharf development

    Dr. Mary Mills of the Greenwich Industrial History Society will be talking about the future of Enderby House at the next meeting of the Shooters Hill Local History Group which will be this Thursday, 16th February. As usual it will start  at 8pm and it will be held in Shrewsbury House. Steve e-mailed the details:

    The next meeting of the Shooters Hill Local History Group will be on Thursday 16 February at 8pm at Shrewsbury House.
    The presentation by Mary Mills of the Greenwich Industrial History Society will be about the future of Enderby House on the Greenwich Peninsula.
    Everyone welcome, a visitor fee applies.

    Enderby House is a grade II listed building which has been neglected and fallen into disrepair over the years. It was built in about 1835 by the Enderby family who established a ropewalk and a factory for making sales on the Enderby Wharf site around the house.  In the 1850s a company called Glass, Elliot & Co took over the site and it was where they jointly made the first transatlantic telegraph cable as well as many other early telegraph cables. Later they were absorbed into the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company (Telcon) which manufactured a second transatlantic telegraph cable at Enderby’s Wharf. This was successfully laid by the SS Great Eastern. Submarine cables were made by a succession of companies at Enderby’s Wharf up until 1975.

    The area has since been redeveloped and the river front is now crowded with blocks of flats, with more being built. It is also the proposed site of a controversial cruise liner terminal: there is concern about the air pollution created by docked liners which will have to generate their own electricity using their diesel-powered engines because no shore-based generating capacity is planned. Enderby House is still standing, sandwiched between blocks of flats and the cruise liner terminal, but its future is  not entirely clear. The developers say they “are proud to be refurbishing the building into a Gastro pub and cultural hub for Greenwich”, but a group of local people have formed the Enderby Group to “secure the future of Enderby House and the cable loading equipment on the Alcatel-Lucent jetty as a permanent centre for telling the story of the sub-sea cable industry on this site, its key role in world-wide communications”. They have their own ideas about what should happen to the house and its surroundings to ensure that the area’s historical importance to modern telecommunications is not lost.

    Thursday’s speaker is the secretary of the Enderby Group, so it should be a fascinating talk covering the history of Enderby House, and much more.

     

    Appendix 3 of the Enderby Group Pender Plaza Proposal: Barratt Model of Enderby House

    Appendix 3 of the Enderby Group Pender Plaza Proposal: Barratt Model of Enderby House

     

     
  • hilly 3:21 pm on November 28, 2016
    Tags: , , shlhg   

    Film Night at the Shooters Hill Local History Group 

    Memorial in Woolwich Cemetery to those killed in the Princess Alice disaster

    Memorial in Woolwich Cemetery to those killed in the Princess Alice disaster

    Shooters Hill Local History Group will be meeting on Thursday, 1st December at Shrewsbury House starting at 8.00pm. Steve wrote to me with the details:

    The Shooters Hill Camcorder Club are putting together a local history film night for the Shooters Hill Local History Group on Thursday 1 December at 8pm at Shrewsbury House.
    Short films will include ‘After the Storm’ about the 1987 storms; ‘Down to Earth’ featuring the tunnels under Greenwich Park and ‘The Princess Alice Disaster’ telling the story of the sinking of the passenger paddle steamer.
    Everyone welcome.
    A visitor fee applies.

    Sounds like a really interesting meeting!
    There’s an imposing memorial to those who died in the sinking of the paddle steamer Princess Alice near Woolwich in 1878. The inscription on the memorial tells the story of what happened:

    The Saloon Steamer
    “Princess Alice,”
    Returning from a pleasure excursion
    Was wrecked off Tripcock Point
    By collision with
    The steam collier “Bywell Castle,”
    On the night of
    September 3rd 1878.
    It was computed that
    Seven Hundred
    Men women and children
    Were on board,
    Of these about 550 were drowned
    One hundred and twenty were buried near this place.
    To the memory
    Of those who perished
    This cross
    Was erected
    By a
    National sixpenny subscription
    To which
    More than 23000 person contributed.

    Inscription on memorial to those who died in The Princess Alice Disaster
    Inscription on memorial to those who died in The Princess Alice DisasterInscription on memorial to those who died in The Princess Alice Disaster
     
  • hilly 5:47 pm on October 18, 2016
    Tags: , , shlhg   

    The WElling WILL REMEMBER THEM project at Shooters Hill Local History Group 

    The Welling War Memorial in its current position at St John the Evangelist Church

    The Welling War Memorial in its current position at St John the Evangelist Church

    Shooters Hill Local History Group‘s next meeting is on Thursday, 20th October at Shrewsbury House starting at 8.00pm. Steve wrote to me with the details:

    A presentation is being given by a member of the East Wickham and Welling War Memorial Trust to the SHLHG on Thursday 20 October at Shrewsbury House at 8pm. A visitor fee applies.
    The presentation is about the WElling WILL REMEMBER THEM community project which received Heritage Lottery funding.
    The project researched those men from the district who served and died in the First World War. See also http://www.ewt.org.uk

    The East Wickham and Welling War Memorial Trust was established following the First World War to raise funds to construct a Memorial Hall  dedicated to the men from the local district who fell in the war. The hall is no longer in existence and the Trust re-registered as a grant giving charity in 1995. Since October 1995 the Trust has awarded grants of over £600,000 to the community, and is probably now the largest source of community funding in East Wickham and Welling.

    The WElling WILL REMEMBER THEM project was set up in 2013 to research and tell the stories of the local men from East Wickham and Welling who fought in the First World War.  Local people were recruited as Research Volunteers to uncover the stories of the 105 men who are listed on their war memorial and to find out about other men from the local area who fought in the Great War.  They were assisted by Year 5 and Year 6 children at Foster’s School who researched some of the men who attended their school.

    Sounds like another interesting meeting at the Shooters Hill Local History Group.

    The Welling War Memorial in its current position at St John the Evangelist Church

    The Welling War Memorial in its current position at St John the Evangelist Church

     
  • hilly 5:36 pm on March 15, 2016
    Tags: , shlhg,   

    Trams around Shooters Hill talk at Shooters Hill Local History Group 

    Woolwich Tramshed

    Woolwich Tramshed

    Head to Shrewsbury House on Thursday, 17th March, for Shooters Hill Local History Group‘s next meeting:  a talk about Trams around Shooters Hill. All are welcome at the event which starts at 8.00pm. There is a small visitors’ fee to cover the cost of the room.

    Steve wrote with the details:

    During the early part of the 20th century, trams were seen as a way of bringing cheap travel to the masses. At 8pm at Shrewsbury House this Thursday 17 March, Tony Johnson will present a talk to the Shooters Hill Local History Group on Trams around Shooters Hill. He will deal with why trams were invented, who promoted them locally, and how they rose and fell as a transport mode. He will review the tram routes in the area around Shooters Hill, including intriguing proposals that were never fulfilled, profusely illustrated with pictures that will tap into nostalgia for the streetscapes of over half a century ago.

    The story of local trams is a fascinating one. The first one opened on 23rd July 1910. It ran from Beresford Square across Woolwich Common past the Shooters Hill Police Station then down Well Hall Road to Eltham Church. Tickets cost 2d, which is slightly less than 1p in new money. The line was unusual in that it was powered through overhead wires, like a trolley bus, rather than through the wheels and rails. This was a requirement of the Astronomer Royal who was concerned that the standard method would cause interference with sensitive astronomical instruments.

    Should be an interesting talk.

    A 4 wheeled tram passes Shooters Hill Police Station from David Lloyd Bathe’s “Steeped in History”

    A 4 wheeled tram passes Shooters Hill Police Station from David Lloyd Bathe’s “Steeped in History”

     
  • hilly 10:06 pm on February 13, 2016
    Tags: , , shlhg,   

    St George’s Garrison Church presentation at Shooters Hill Local History Group 

    Visitors to St. George’s Garrison Church Sunday opening

    Visitors to St. George’s Garrison Church Sunday opening

    Shooters Hill Local History Group‘s next meeting at Shrewsbury House this Thursday, 18th February at 8.00pm is a presentation about St. George’s Garrison Church. Steve wrote with the details:

    Julie Ricketts, Heritage Project Officer for St George’s Garrison Church, Woolwich will be giving a presentation to the Shooters Hill Local History Group on Thursday 18 February at 8pm at Shrewsbury House, Bushmoor Cresent, Shooters Hill.
    A visitor fee applies.
    Julie will be covering the Garrison Church’s past and present and discussing plans for future events as well as volunteering opportunities.
    All welcome.

    It’ll be interesting to hear about what’s planned for St George’s. They have recently appointed a board of trustees to be responsible for the church and the area of land around it as far as the Second Boer War memorial on the corner with Woolwich New Road. The board will be chaired by Tim Barnes QC, champion of many Greenwich causes: he was chair of the Greenwich Society and the St Alfege’s restoration appeal and is currently also a trustee of the Greenwich and Bexley Community Hospice and chair of the Friends of Westcombe Woodlands. Other trustees include the Bishop of Woolwich, the officer Commanding the Woolwich Barracks and Woolwich Common councillor David Gardner.

    Royal Artillery Barracks seen from St George's Chapel

    Royal Artillery Barracks seen from St George’s Chapel

    Now that phase 1 of the restoration of the chapel is complete the team there are thinking about raising money for phase 2. They are keen to replace the wooden doors at the entrance with glass doors so that the interior will be visible to passers-by, and further work is needed on the pulpit and altar as well as the other mosaics. Public access and use of the chapel is important, and from the start of the year it has been open every Sunday from 10.00am to 1.00pm, with help from a team of volunteers, and it is planned to open for longer when the weather improves later in the year.

    Volunteers will be key to the future of St George’s, and Julie will be talking about volunteering opportunities at her presentation on Thursday. It should also include some of the marvellous photographs of the garrison church in it’s heyday. Well worth a visit to Shrewsbury House.

    Detail of the altar at St George's

    Detail of the altar at St George’s

    Memorial to the fallen of Woolwich

    Memorial to the fallen of Woolwich

     
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