Too Sloe

Back in October when the sweet chestnut season was in full swing, I mentioned that I was looking forward to the first frost of the year, the seasonal cue to make sloe gin… however climate chaos (or cyclical warming as some would have it) appears to have put a kibosh on my plans, as whilst I patiently waited for jack frost to turn up and ice those berries near the duck pond, someone or something came along and snaffled the lot!

My first thoughts were that some human(s) had picked them all, but considering how high up some had been, I began to wonder if perhaps those pesky parakeets had been at them?

Anyway, today I was out testing the unofficial shortcut from Dot Hill to Cheriton Drive (very muddy), and I stumbled upon a whole load of blackthorns at the entrance to the old allotments! Luckily enough I still had a bit of gin left (which I’d been drowning my sorrows in after the loss of the other sloes), so I grabbed about 40 or so, plus a thorn, leaving plenty enough for any other foragers/birds in the area. There’s also a load of rosehips there too, at least that’s what I think they are.

The home made recipe is totally straightforward, but superior to the shop-bought version, which apparently gets made with rough spirits and cordial. Essentially, you just use the sloes to double the amount of drink, and it makes a very pleasant winter warmer:

Ingredients:

  • enough sloes to fill bottle of gin
  • one empty bottle of gin
  • one full bottle of gin
  • one thorn

Method:

  • prick the berries with the thorn
  • drop them into the bottles with gin
  • shake gently every now and then
  • the colour and flavour is optimal after three months, but it rarely remains in the bottle that long
  • decant carefully for clarity

2 Replies to “Too Sloe”

  1. Hmmm. I am sad. I had to look up “sloes” in google image as I had no idea what they are. But I’m intrigued now. My favourite gin is Bombay Sapphire which glows rather prettily under UV lights. What colour does the sloe gin end up?

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